The Snail Trail

Travelling with my home on my back and in no hurry to get anywhere

Meander River, Deloraine Tas


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A Tourist in Tasmania – Delightful Deloraine

I loved Deloraine the last time I visited in 2014 and this time around I think I love it even more.

deloraine-map

It has a real arty vibe to it with Galleries, Art Shops,  Coffee Shops and Op Shops lining the steep main road that curls around bends on its way uphill from the Meander River as you approach from the East.

Cross the river, cross the railway line and wend your way through the town. So many quirky little shops invite you to explore …..

Here’s one of my favourites. It’s called Elf on the Shelf. I’m pretty sure I know how to speak Zombie – give me a couple of drinks and I can demonstrate it for you, but if you want to study it yourself you can buy the book here.

The Information Centre is at the top of the hill and it’s a MUST SEE visit if you are in Deloraine. In the forecourt is the statue of a famous race horse, Malua, who won Adelaide Cup (1884),Newmarket Handicap (1884), Melbourne Stakes (1884) Oakleigh Plate (1884), Melbourne Cup (1884), Australian Cup (1886) and then went on to win the Grand National Hurdle (1889). What a champion!

But it’s when you step inside that you will discover the amazing Art in Silk exhibition, with a movie that tells you how it was developed as a community initiative and the stunning panels they created. It truly is spectacular. It does cost to view it but it is something you won’t want to miss! These photos were taken when I last visited. It’s a wonder they are not worn out I have shown them to so many people 🙂

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Drive around the back streets and you’ll discover lovely old homes like The Manse, with outstanding views over the surrounding countryside.

Happy Campers: There is a Free Camp for self contained vehicles as you travel into Deloraine from the East. Turn right at the Police Station and follow the road around. The camp is well signed. It’s only a short walk into town.

Deloraine is a short detour off the Bass Highway that links Devonport to Launceston. It’s about 55 kms from Devonport and only 50 kms to Launceston. If you are looking for somewhere to stop when you get off the ferry (or you’re on the way there) this little town is well worth a visit!

 

Legerwood Tasmania


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A Tourist in Tasmania – Legerwood

On the way from Scottsdale to St Helens you pass the turn off to Legerwood. Don’t drive past, turn off the main road and visit this little town famous for it’s carved tree sculptures with a very special story.

At the end of World War 1,  nine trees were planted in memory of the seven local soldiers that were killed in the war plus one tree for Gallipoli and one for the Anzacs.

By 2001 the trees were declared a safety hazard, but the local community looked for ways to retain their memorial and Eddie Freeman, the chainsaw artist was enlisted to bring the soldiers back to life in sculpture. With much research and photos, the fallen soldiers have been re-created and each tree tells their story, and of those left behind.

I found the following information about these local heroes on the North East Tasmania Tourism site…..

Private Alan Robert Andrews

 

 

Private Alan Robert Andrews – died in France on July 25th, 1916 aged 19 years: Alan Andrews was the first soldier born and raised in the area to give his life.  A farmhand on his family’s farm, Private Andrews is depicted with his dog, hat in hand, seemingly waving goodbye to his loved ones.

 

 

 

Legerwood TasmaniaPrivate Thomas Edward Edwards – died on February 19th, 1918 and was buried in Belgium: At the highest point of what remains of a giant American Sequoia, Thomas Edwards stands with his wife in their final embrace before he sets off to war.  Surrounding them are the harrowing scenes of battle mixed with the joy of family welcoming home returned servicemen.
On one limb sits a man with bandaged eyes, suffering from the effects of mustard gas while next to him lies a soldier with a mirror box looking out over the trenches.
Further around the tree a little boy waves farewell as a smiling daughter sits on her grandfather’s shoulders, welcoming her father home.

 

 

 

Legerwood Tasmania

 

 

Private William Henry Hyde – died aged 27 years. In France on July 7th, 1916: Shouldering his lumber, sawmill hand William Hyde stands next to a saw blade representing an industry that was – and still is – part of the life-blood of the community.

 

 

 

 

Private Robert James Jenkins – aged 28 years and  killed near Flers (Somme) July 1st, 1917: The story of Robert “Bobby” Jenkins is perhaps the most poignant of the seven men. Private Jenkins migrated to Ringarooma from England at the start of the 20th century and made his living touring local halls as a tenor.  It was in his new found home that he met young Amy (Trippy) Forsyth, and the two were engaged shortly before he went to war.
Private Jenkins fell at the Somme in 1917 and a heartbroken Trippy never married.  She kept a photo of Private Jenkins, together with his engagement ring, beside her bed until she died at the age of 76.  The photo was used to carve his likeness in the tree, looking across at his fiancé on an opposite limb.

 

Private George Peddle – aged 25 years and killed at Passchendaele on October 13th, 1917: Private Peddle was the son of George Peddle Snr, famous for his wooden chairs which have now become sought after collectables. Before he enlisted Private Peddle was the Manager of his father’s sawmill, a bushman and a bullock driver.

 

Legerwood Tasmania

 

Private John Henry Gregg McDougall – aged 19 years. Died at Passchendaele on October 13th, 1917: Private McDougall was a porter at the Railway Station, which once stood directly behind the memorial reserve.  His statue now stands holding signal flags directing traffic through the town.

 

It is ironic that Privates McDougall and Peddle both fell on the same day in the same battle at Passchendaele; this would have been very little comfort for their families in such a tight-knit town.

I challenge you to visit this amazing memorial and not get a tear in your eye. It is a truly remarkable tribute by a community to their heroes of the past, particularly as they salvaged the original memorial in such a unique way.

Bridport, Tasmania


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A Tourist in Tasmania – Bridport

Bridport is on the north east coast of Tasmania, a pretty fishing village with many small cove like beaches.

The caravan park and camping ground extends for ever along the foreshore but was cost prohibitive for me at $25 a night for an unpowered site. It did have lovely beach/bush camping areas though.

There are extensive walking tracks around the area and along the waterfront that direct you to some of the local historical landmarks like the old jetty.

Bridport, Tasmania

Bridport, Tasmania

The Old Jetty, Bridport

There is lovely safe swimming here in what is delightfully called Mermaids Pool, naturally created by the rocks and the tide. It makes you wish you were a mermaid!

Bridport, Tasmania

At the entry to the town you cross a small inlet where a couple of fishing boats are moored and I also noticed fish hatchery ponds on the way in.

I love the look of these old jetties when you look up the creek the other way! They don’t look too substantial, do they?

I was in Bridport to get the canvas replaced on Brutus the Beast, my pop top campervan and I can highly recommend Kerry, the Canvas Man from North East Canvas if you need any canvas work done. I know some of my travelling buddies have often needed awning repairs etc, so he’s your man when you’re in Tasmania! He was so quick – within 24 hours the old canvas was gone and a brand new PVC ‘hat’ was installed.

 

Happy Campers: There is no free camping in Bridport and the caravan park has a monopoly on waterfront locations. There is free camping at Scottsdale, just 20kms away, but that is the subject of another blog!

 

 


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Day 7 Photo Blog – Let’s go BIG

My instruction are Today, let’s go big. Photograph something of massive size, inside or outside.

Well, Australia is known for it’s BIG THINGS, like the BIG Pineapple, the BIG Prawn, the BIG Merino and the BIG Banana to name just a few. Travelling through South Australia I came across this BIG old tree near Orroroo. It’s a giant red gum thought to be over 500 years old. It measures nearly 11 metres around the trunk.

And then I thought about the BIG Boab Tree near Derby in the Kimberley’s of Western Australia

So on my drive into Campbell Town, Tasmania yesterday I stopped and photographed this tree. No, it’s not particularly BIG, but it does have a prominent position in this photo that makes it appear bigger than it is.

IMG_6693Campbell Town

At Harvey Dickson’s Country Music Centre near Boyup Brook in Western Australia there’s a BIG guitar –

Harvey Dickson's, Boyup Brook, WA

Harvey Dickson’s Country Music Centre

 

and in Mataranka in the Northern Territory there’s a very BIG ant hill –

Mataranka

Termite mound at Mataranka

These dainty little orchids I photographed at Lake Indoon in Western Australia look so much bigger than they are as I discovered the Macro setting on my camera that allowed me to get up close and personal –

Spider Orchids Lake Indoon

Spider Orchids

Orchids Lake Indoon

Cowslip Orchid

It’s a BIG effort to keep up to date with these photo blogging challenges ……

Ellendale Lake, Western Australia


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Day 4 Photo blogging – Bliss

This has been such a hard topic for me – not because I am never blissful, but I don’t know if I’ve ever captured it on film! So I’ve stretched my mind and come up with the following…..Are they blissful? I’m not sure, but they did make me feel very happy.

In 2015 I finally visited some of Australia’s iconic landmarks.

Uluru, Northern Territory, was once known as Ayers Rock.

Uluru, Northern Territory, was once known as Ayers Rock.

Kata Tjuta, formerly known as The Olgas, is a short distance from Uluru.

Kata Tjuta, formerly known as The Olgas, is a short distance from Uluru.

And then heading north from Alice Springs are the famous Devils’s Marbles.

Bliss? Sitting around a campfire with fellow travellers at the end of the day.

Cape Keraudren Western Australia

Jose was our resident fire lighter!

And being visited by the locals at some wonderful camp sites –

 

Lake Brockman, Western Australia

Wild birds? Sitting on my knee? Gotta love it!

My idea of absolute bliss? Lying on a pristine beach, feeling the sun warm you to the bones and drifting off – not to sleep, but to that blissful state of being aware of what’s around you but not being part of it at all. Now that’s hard to capture with words, let alone a photograph!

 


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10 days of photo blogging – Day 2

Day 2 – Street

I usually avoid busy streets preferring to spend my driving time on the open road. This road travels between Millstream Chichester National Park and Karijini National Park in Western Australia. It filled my home with red dust and rattled cupboards open, but oh, the scenery …..

Pilbara Red_1861

And now for something completely different …… this is the main street of the little town of Baliingup, in Western Australia. I’ve discovered so many of these country towns have some quirky little feature that makes them memorable.

IMG_5646Balingup

I’m so lucky my lifestyle gives me this variety of experiences.


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10 days of Photo blogging – Day 1

Day 1 – Home

My blog, The Snail Trail, is so called because I really do ‘travel with my home on my back’! As many of you know my home is Brutus the Beast, my trusty little campervan, so my home goes with me as I travel around Australia.

Here’s a place I really enjoyed calling ‘home’ last Christmas – Stockton Lake, Western Australia.

IMG_5845Stockton Christmas 2015

Looking across the lake from my ‘verandah’